Tuesday, February 21, 2017

AP publishes history of baseball’s ‘Banned’ players, coaches

Originally posted on AP.org

The Associated Press and Diversion Books have published “Banned: Baseball’s Blacklist of All-Stars and Also-Rans,” a comprehensive history written by former AP sports writer Hal Bock.

From Shoeless Joe Jackson to Jenrry Mejia, Bock delves deep into the ball players, umpires, coaches and others who were suspended from the game temporarily or, in some cases, indefinitely, using colorful anecdotes to paint a vivid picture of baseball's scandalous past.
For those who follow the current corporate era of businessmen players and billionaire owners, "Banned" serves as a reminder that America's pastime evolved from the days when gamblers filled the stands and influenced poorly paid scoundrels on the diamond.

John Thorn, Major League Baseball's official historian, writes in the introduction:
Hal Bock has chosen a subject of enduring fascination. Most of those banned from baseball over the years have been minor figures and, except for antiquarians, are shrouded in the mists of time. Other, more formidable players, prompt us — even decades after their deaths — to ponder the frailty of man, shake our heads and think what might have been.
Bock's thorough review spans from the late 1800s to present, covering everything from George Bechtel's expulsion for game fixing in 1876 — the first-ever player to be expelled — to the lifetime suspension handed down to Pete Rose in 1989 for betting on games, among other key moments.
Bock, a sports writer for more than 40 years, has covered myriad major sporting events, including 30 World Series, making him the ideal storyteller for this far-reaching retrospective.
"This is a fascinating and fun read about baseball's underbelly," said Peter Costanzo, AP's digital publishing and archival manager. "Hal's knowledge of the game, its history and his reverence for those who play it is evident on every page."
"Banned" includes an afterword by AP baseball writer Ronald Blum, as well as more than two dozen photographs from AP's archives.

About AP

The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. Founded in 1846, AP today is the most trusted source of independent news and information. On any given day, more than half the world's population sees news from AP. On the web: www.ap.org.

Contact

Lauren Easton
Director of Media Relations
The Associated Press
212-621-7005
leaston@ap.org
Christine Saunders
Diversion Books
212-961-6390 ext. 101
christine@diversionbooks.com

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

AP publishes special edition of ‘Pearl Harbor’ for 75th anniversary

Originally posted on AP.org

The Associated Press announced today it has published a special edition of its Pearl Harbor book to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the surprise attack on the U.S. naval base by Japanese forces.
“Pearl Harbor: An AP Special Anniversary Edition” is a comprehensive account of the history and events leading up to the attack on Dec. 7, 1941, which led the U.S. into World War II. It also examines the relationship between the U.S. and Japan and details the beginning of America’s involvement in the war.
The anniversary edition features more than 75 iconic and rare photographs, artifacts from the AP Corporate Archives, a narrative from a reporter at AP’s Washington, D.C., bureau who got the first message about the attack on Pearl Harbor, and President Franklin Roosevelt’s Dec. 8, 1941, speech to Congress declaring America’s entry into World War II.
Former AP war correspondent Richard Pyle writes in a new introduction:

Explosions reverberating from the vast naval bastion of Pearl Harbor left no doubt that the world
 was suddenly and irretrievably a different place, that is until a new generation of Americans would experience another harrowing surprise attack on September 11, 2001, near New York Harbor in lower Manhattan. Again, nearly 3,000 people were killed, the U.S. went to war and the world was forever changed. 
"The AP honors the memory of the Pearl Harbor attack from the unique perspective only reporters of The Associated Press can provide," said Peter Costanzo, AP's digital publishing and archival manager. "This special edition is a powerful keepsake that ensures we never forget those who perished on that harrowing day, as well as those who survived and went on to defend freedom at home and abroad."
"Pearl Harbor: An AP Special Anniversary Edition" is available in paperback and as an e-book on Amazon

About AP
The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. Founded in 1846, AP today is the most trusted source of independent news and information. On any given day, more than half the world's population sees news from AP. On the web: www.ap.org.

Contact
Lauren Easton
Director of Media Relations
The Associated Press

212.621.7005

leaston@ap.org